Politics Make Us All Into Humorless Killjoys Who Can’t Enjoy a Movie

It’s annoying when a feminist sees a movie and calls it misogynist because some character said something that her paranoid mind interpreted as her favorite type of oppression.

It’s not any cuter coming from the opposite political side.

If politics is the only thing you see when you watch movies, you might be a humorless killjoy.

If you often get offended about some minor detail in an otherwise decent movie, you might be a humorless killjoy.

If you’d rather complain about lack of *insert adjective**insert race/sex/religion/whatever* characters in the media instead of writing your own, you might be a humorless killjoy.

 

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38 Responses to Politics Make Us All Into Humorless Killjoys Who Can’t Enjoy a Movie

  1. andriodvageta says:

    Here here! The politics and PC and feminist crowd among others just have to take the fun out of everything. This being “offended” by everything has to fucking stop. It’s ruining everything!

  2. CUCH says:

    I am politically on the left and I get fed up with it too. Why should the next James Bond or Doctor Who be a “WOC” or a transgender, disabled single parent?

    This insistence of proper representation has to stop before we all go mad.

    • andriodvageta says:

      Yeah, this reminds me of how TV commercials it seems want to have only gay or mixed colored couples and families for some reason. Look, I have no problem with mixed or gay families, at all, but they’re a vast minority. So to me when I see this stuff I just can’t help but feel “agenda”. It’s almost like it’s becoming a crime to be straight or a same race relationship.

      Like I said in my first comment, every body being offended by everything is, I feel, making the situation worse than anything. Why? Because this stuff is being pushed so hard and unnaturally.

    • Haha, James Bond should be a mentally disabled fat asian woman for once 🙂
      But seriously, James Bond is James Bond. Nothing wrong with him staying white.

      • CUCH says:

        I don’t actually have a problem with a black James Bond, so long as that black actor is chosen on merit rather than because he’s black.

  3. Any particular movie in mind when you wrote this?

  4. Ashley says:

    I agree. You will ruin your life if you convince yourself you can’t go see a movie because it could possibly maaayyybe be interpreted as sexist in one scene, or if you are all mad that there’s women castes in traditionally male role or if there’s too many black people for your liking in your movie. If you like something, just fucking like it.

    • andriodvageta says:

      “if you are all mad that there’s women castes in traditionally male role”

      Generally this doesn’t bother me but in certain instances, like the new Ghostbusters movie that has an all female cast, we clearly have a case of some sort of PC/feminist/women empowerment agenda bullshit going on. Of this I have no doubt.

      I don’t have a problem with these sort of moves when it’s natural but in instances like this it seems pretty forced and is more about trying to make some “point” then them trying to make a good movie for the sake of a good movie.

      • I will watch a movie and decide for myself if it sucks or not. I only care whether it’s good. I recommend doing the same. After all, imitation is the greatest form of flattery. The old Ghostbusters will remain where it is, ready to be watched by fans whenever they want. A remake or a shitty sequel is not going to change that.
        Having said that, I don’t really like it when they write a “tough kickass woman” character and make those things the main point of the character. It feels so hollow and annoying. But a lot of male directors seem to like that sort of thing.

      • Ashley says:

        I understand that, and you have a right to criticize that and I’d say you have a point. I think people might like it better if it wasn’t a copycat of Ghostbusters. Someone could write a new story about kick ass chicks being superheroes, but since the trend is bringing back stories of the past, it does seem like there’s a political point trying to be made by the writers. I just know of a few people who were all hyped to see the new Star Wars but decided not to because of strong female characters and racial diversity, and that to me is just silly. My guy is a pretty big fan, and he’s dedicated enough to watch it and then judge whether or not the changes were for the better or worse.

  5. MRDA says:

    I made similar points re:Mad Max, and the risible alt-Right sentiments on Star Wars just reinforce much of the shite I said: https://mrda.wordpress.com/2015/05/19/furore-road-women-enter-one-manosphere-leaves/

  6. Ha! I totally agree with this. Nothing is more annoying than watching a movie with someone who believes everything is a social commentary or a political statement. It doesn’t even matter if I agree with their politics, it’s still annoying. A killjoy, indeed.

  7. Liz says:

    Lol Emma.
    I confess, I am a humorless killjoy. 😛
    As a result, I don’t watch a lot of movies. When I do watch most forms of modern “visual entertainment” today, it’s just too obvious to me that there’s a prosyletizing agenda intended for the audience to swallow.
    So, yeah, I find it hard to enjoy it. I don’t like being fed anyone’s agenda, even if it’s an agenda I might agree with. For example, Vendetta was unwatchable for me. The only thing that was missing in that movie was Bush running around and dancing with Ghandi’s head on a pike and a bunch of tee shirts with “we’re the bad guys, get it?”
    There’s also quite a few famous actors I refuse to watch, for similar reasons.
    If the entertainer’s mouth is too big in public I can’t watch them on the screen. Or if they just come across as disgusting people in general I can’t get the image out of my head so I can’t watch them.

    Sean Penn=no. Brad Pitt or anyone else on the cover of tabloids every single week=no. Nothing from Michael Moore. Sometimes people are redeemable, though. I’ve liked Alec Baldwin (and I had placed him on my boycott list) ever since he did his own voice for Team America. Anyone with that good of a sense of humor who doesn’t take himself too seriously gets kudos in my book.

    In a nutshell, when I seek entertainment I want to be entertained, not supporting some actor’s or director’s or screenwriter’s personal agenda.
    So…Bah humbug. 😉

    😛

    • Liz says:

      I guess I should add, there are some exceptions. Case in point above, Team America. But in that case the satire was THE POINT and the formula wasn’t intended to mislead the audience and spoon feed them a “hidden” agenda which comes across as subtle as a dump truck driving through a nitroglycerin plant.

      I like primary no-name (or small name) actors in movies, who can’t use their fame as a bully pulpit. I appreciate actors and actresses who are famous and choose NOT to use their fame as a bully pulpit.

      • Liz says:

        One. More. Thing.
        This kind of summarizes things from my perspective, in a nutshell. Have you ever heard the phrase, “If something is free, you are the product”?
        I consider this type of thing to be similar to charging me to be the product. I’m actually paying to be subjected to a political advertisement. That’s even worse than product placement, which is irritating enough.

      • Haha, true 🙂 Although Hollywood blockbusters aren’t free yet.

    • I’m with Liz. I’m a humorless killjoy.

      It’s beyond politics with me. Everything about every kind of art makes me hyper-critical. At the same time, I have lost all of the joy I used to get from art.

      It used to be that I hated everything but anime.

      Lately I hate anime too.

      That’s why I haven’t been blogging about anime lately.

    • It’s all a matter of taste. If the feminist hype or an actor’s views annoy you, then you’re not being a killjoy if you can’t watch them. We don’t watch things we don’t think we’re gonna enjoy. I’m more annoyed by people who don’t even see a movie, but think they already know what’s in it, and say it needs to be boycotted. You don’t have to watch something to know you don’t need it in your life, but you’ll look silly critiquing something you haven’t even seen/read.

  8. Just curious, why do you have links to capt capitalism/ROK who advocate boycotting movies? Aren’t they playing the same “identity politics” of the left they claim to hate so much?

  9. Three things:

    >If politics is the only thing you see when you watch movies, you might be a humorless killjoy.

    Yeah, sure, a critic who is only motivated by kneejerk politics is failing in his aesthetic duty. But a strict devotion to aesthetics can make a critic into a killjoy as surely as politics.

    >If you often get offended about some minor detail in an otherwise decent movie, you might be a humorless killjoy.

    Sure. Of course, in my case, I’m a killjoy because I criticize EVERY detail of every artwork.

    >If you’d rather complain about lack of *insert adjective**insert race/sex/religion/whatever* characters in the media instead of writing your own, you might be a humorless killjoy.

    Bear in mind that most critics have created some amount of art. Art creation is highly stressful. I am lazy. I reserve the right to criticize art even when I’m too lazy to create new art.

    • “But a strict devotion to aesthetics can make a critic into a killjoy as surely as politics.”

      Don’t disagree at all – if the politics are there, or you see bias, there is no need to ignore it.

      As for art creation, I was thinking of people who say other people should change their art to suit their plan for fixing society better. I’m not saying you can’t criticize art until you made your own art.

  10. David Foster says:

    There were strident objections to the book/movie “Gone Girl” because the female protagonist wasn’t such a nice person, and this was seen as stereotyping. I was reminded of some observations by Russian rocket developer Boris Chertok on the kinds of poetry that were and weren’t allowed in the Soviet Army during the Stalin era. See my post Life in the Fully Politicized Society:

    http://chicagoboyz.net/archives/46442.html

    • Liz says:

      That was well written, David Foster.
      The “politicized society” is alive and well in the US. Gone girl might have encountered criticism for the unflattering portrayal of a predatory female, but there’s the flip side of undeserved praise (for the “correct” portrayals) too.
      Just check out Rotten Tomatoes with a 93 percent approval rating for the new Star Wars movie. That doesn’t smack of objectivity to me.
      I’ll never forget a homosexual friend’s take down of the movie Brokeback Mountain. He thought it was so/so, but pointed out that if he heard one more review about how brave it was, he was going to scream.

  11. Nick Jihad says:

    Count me among the humorless killjoys. The problem is that by the time you realize that the movie is really a lecture, you’ve already paid your money and lost a perfectly good Friday night. It’s not boycotting, just a helpful warning, to know in advance which movies to avoid.

  12. Totally agree with this; movies should be to entertain not to push some kind of political agenda.

    Our society is getting more and more authoritarian and Puritanical all the time.

    It’s a real worry.

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